National Experts Test GMS Guidelines for Assessing Watershed Climate Vulnerability

Watershed experts, community development planners, and climate change specialists from the six GMS countries gathered in Bangkok this week at a workshop to test new guidelines for assessing watershed climate vulnerability.

Dr. Alex Smajgl from the Mekong Region Futures Institute co-facilitated the workshop and said the guidelines will fill an important knowledge gap in the region.

“Existing guidelines are often quite vague and are usually for the village level. Watersheds are becoming an ever more important focus for development planning and are also where many major climate impacts and changes will occur.

“These guidelines will not only be useful for conducting assessments and proposing solutions at watershed-scales, but also for governments to develop terms of references to commission assessments and monitor implementation,” he said.

The thirty national participants included representatives from government agencies, universities and research institutes, and non-government organizations. Together they reviewed the principles, processes, and tools presented in the draft guidelines. They also tested the applicability of the guidelines through case-studies and other group work.

The 2-day workshop wrapped up with a discussion on potential future steps to disseminate and promote the use of the guidelines in the GMS countries. This included translations, creating training materials, and developing capacity building programs. 

The guidelines -  a joint product of the GMS Climate Adaptation Roundtable – will be refined based on the feedback from the workshop participants and are expected to be published later this year.

The workshop was organized by the GMS Environment Operations Center in collaboration with the Mekong Region Futures Institute and the Stockholm Environment Institute.

See below to download the draft guidelines and workshop presentations. 

See more content: Climate Change GMS

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