SEA Support for Socioeconomic Development Planning (2015–2016)

Under Viet Nam’s 2011 Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) decree, development plans of five years duration or more, including socioeconomic development plans (SEDP), are required to undergo an SEA. However, implementation of the decree is still relatively weak, with technical SEA capacity one of the major constraints.

The Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI) is responsible for some of the country’s most important planning, including national, regional and provincial SEDPs. SEA has already been applied for several provincial SEDPs, usually with support from development partners.

Under this activity, CEP and Viet Nam’s Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources will increase MPI’s awareness about the value of SEA as a planning approach as well as build its, and provincial planner’s, technical capacity to conduct SEA for socioeconomic development planning.

Major tasks include:

  • SEA awareness raising workshops targeting senior decision makers from MPI as well as provincial planners.
  • Design and deliver a training program for MPI officials and provincial planners to implement SEA for SEDP, including specific tools such as scenario development and spatial planning.
  • Identify additional actions for improving effective SEA practice in Viet Nam.

Publish Date: 22nd August 2014

Last Updated: 16th November 2015


See also

SEA Support for Land Use Planning in Viet Nam (2015-2016)

16th June 2016
Activity

Viet Nam’s 10-year Land Use Plans undergo revisions every 5 years, a process led by the Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment (MONRE).

More details

Multisector Planning for Sustainable Development (2015–2016)

8th August 2014
Activity

Development planning in the GMS is often fragmented, with ministries and sectors lacking the capacity, tools, or incentives to work together to meet sustainable development goals. When competing for the same natural resources, implementing one sector plan is often to the detriment of another. As a result, resource allocation can become inefficient, costly, and ultimately unsustainable.

More details
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